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syslog-ng Open Source Edition 3.26 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction to syslog-ng The concepts of syslog-ng Installing syslog-ng The syslog-ng OSE quick-start guide The syslog-ng OSE configuration file source: Read, receive, and collect log messages
How sources work default-network-drivers: Receive and parse common syslog messages internal: Collecting internal messages file: Collecting messages from text files wildcard-file: Collecting messages from multiple text files linux-audit: Collecting messages from Linux audit logs network: Collecting messages using the RFC3164 protocol (network() driver) nodejs: Receiving JSON messages from nodejs applications mbox: Converting local email messages to log messages osquery: Collect and parse osquery result logs pipe: Collecting messages from named pipes pacct: Collecting process accounting logs on Linux program: Receiving messages from external applications python: writing server-style Python sources python-fetcher: writing fetcher-style Python sources snmptrap: Read Net-SNMP traps sun-streams: Collecting messages on Sun Solaris syslog: Collecting messages using the IETF syslog protocol (syslog() driver) system: Collecting the system-specific log messages of a platform systemd-journal: Collecting messages from the systemd-journal system log storage systemd-syslog: Collecting systemd messages using a socket tcp, tcp6, udp, udp6: Collecting messages from remote hosts using the BSD syslog protocol— OBSOLETE unix-stream, unix-dgram: Collecting messages from UNIX domain sockets stdin: Collecting messages from the standard input stream
destination: Forward, send, and store log messages
amqp: Publishing messages using AMQP collectd: sending metrics to collectd elasticsearch2: Sending messages directly to Elasticsearch version 2.0 or higher (DEPRECATED) elasticsearch-http: Sending messages to Elasticsearch HTTP Bulk API file: Storing messages in plain-text files graphite: Sending metrics to Graphite Sending logs to Graylog hdfs: Storing messages on the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) Posting messages over HTTP http: Posting messages over HTTP without Java kafka: Publishing messages to Apache Kafka (Java implementation) kafka: Publishing messages to Apache Kafka (C implementation, using the librdkafka client) loggly: Using Loggly logmatic: Using Logmatic.io mongodb: Storing messages in a MongoDB database network: Sending messages to a remote log server using the RFC3164 protocol (network() driver) osquery: Sending log messages to osquery's syslog table pipe: Sending messages to named pipes program: Sending messages to external applications pseudofile() python: writing custom Python destinations redis: Storing name-value pairs in Redis riemann: Monitoring your data with Riemann slack: Sending alerts and notifications to a Slack channel smtp: Generating SMTP messages (email) from logs snmp: Sending SNMP traps Splunk: Sending log messages to Splunk sql: Storing messages in an SQL database stomp: Publishing messages using STOMP syslog: Sending messages to a remote logserver using the IETF-syslog protocol syslog-ng(): Forward logs to another syslog-ng node tcp, tcp6, udp, udp6: Sending messages to a remote log server using the legacy BSD-syslog protocol (tcp(), udp() drivers) Telegram: Sending messages to Telegram unix-stream, unix-dgram: Sending messages to UNIX domain sockets usertty: Sending messages to a user terminal: usertty() destination Write your own custom destination in Java or Python Client-side failover
log: Filter and route log messages using log paths, flags, and filters Global options of syslog-ng OSE TLS-encrypted message transfer template and rewrite: Format, modify, and manipulate log messages parser: Parse and segment structured messages db-parser: Process message content with a pattern database (patterndb) Correlating log messages Enriching log messages with external data Statistics of syslog-ng Multithreading and scaling in syslog-ng OSE Troubleshooting syslog-ng Best practices and examples The syslog-ng manual pages Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives (by-nc-nd) License Glossary

How pattern matching works

Figure 20: Applying patterns

The followings describe how patterns work. This information applies to program patterns and message patterns alike, even though message patterns are used to illustrate the procedure.

Patterns can consist of literals (keywords, or rather, keycharacters) and pattern parsers. Pattern parsers attempt to parse a sequence of characters according to certain rules.

NOTE:

Wildcards and regular expressions cannot be used in patterns. The @ character must be escaped, that is, to match for this character, you have to write @@ in your pattern. This is required because pattern parsers of syslog-ng are enclosed between @ characters.

When a new message arrives, syslog-ng attempts to classify it using the pattern database. The available patterns are organized alphabetically into a tree, and syslog-ng inspects the message character-by-character, starting from the beginning. This approach ensures that only a small subset of the rules must be evaluated at any given step, resulting in high processing speed. Note that the speed of classifying messages is practically independent from the total number of rules.

For example, if the message begins with the Apple string, only patterns beginning with the character A are considered. In the next step, syslog-ng selects the patterns that start with Ap, and so on, until there is no more specific pattern left. The syslog-ng application has a strong preference for rules that match the input string completely.

Note that literal matches take precedence over pattern parser matches: if at a step there is a pattern that matches the next character with a literal, and another pattern that would match it with a parser, the pattern with the literal match is selected. Using the previous example, if at the third step there is the literal pattern Apport and a pattern parser Ap@STRING@, the Apport pattern is matched. If the literal does not match the incoming string (for example, Apple), syslog-ng attempts to match the pattern with the parser. However, if there are two or more parsers on the same level, only the first one will be applied, even if it does not perfectly match the message.

If there are two parsers at the same level (for example, Ap@STRING@ and Ap@QSTRING@), it is random which pattern is applied (technically, the one that is loaded first). However, if the selected parser cannot parse at least one character of the message, the other parser is used. But having two different parsers at the same level is extremely rare, so the impact of this limitation is much less than it appears.


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Artificial ignorance

Artificial ignorance is a method used to detect anomalies. When applied to log analysis, it means that you ignore the regular, common log messages — these are the result of the regular behavior of your system, and therefore are not too concerning. However, new messages that have not appeared in the logs before can signal important events, and should be therefore investigated. "By definition, something we have never seen before is anomalous" (Marcus J. Ranum). 

The syslog-ng application can classify messages using a pattern database: messages that do not match any pattern are classified as unknown. This provides a way to use artificial ignorance to review your log messages. You can periodically review the unknown messages — syslog-ng can send them to a separate destination, and add patterns for them to the pattern database. By reviewing and manually classifying the unknown messages, you can iteratively classify more and more messages, until only the really anomalous messages show up as unknown.

Obviously, for this to work, a large number of message patterns are required. The radix-tree matching method used for message classification is very effective, can be performed very fast, and scales very well. Basically the time required to perform a pattern matching is independent from the number of patterns in the database. For sample pattern databases, see Downloading sample pattern databases.


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Using pattern databases

To classify messages using a pattern database, include a db-parser() statement in your syslog-ng configuration file using the following syntax:

Declaration:
parser <identifier> {
    db-parser(file("<database_filename>"));
};

Note that using the parser in a log statement only performs the classification, but does not automatically do anything with the results of the classification.

Example: Defining pattern databases

The following statement uses the database located at /opt/syslog-ng/var/db/patterndb.xml.

parser pattern_db {
    db-parser(
        file("/opt/syslog-ng/var/db/patterndb.xml")
    );
};

To apply the patterns on the incoming messages, include the parser in a log statement:

log {
    source(s_all);
    parser(pattern_db);
    destination( di_messages_class);
};

By default, syslog-ng tries to apply the patterns to the body of the incoming messages, that is, to the value of the $MESSAGE macro. If you want to apply patterns to a specific field, or to an expression created from the log message (for example, using template functions or other parsers), use the message-template() option. For example:

parser pattern_db {
    db-parser(
        file("/opt/syslog-ng/var/db/patterndb.xml")
        message-template("${MY-CUSTOM-FIELD-TO-PROCESS}")
    );
};

By default, syslog-ng uses the name of the application (content of the ${PROGRAM} macro) to select which rules to apply to the message. If the content of the ${PROGRAM} macro is not the proper name of the application, you can use the program-template() option to specify it. For example:

parser pattern_db {
    db-parser(
        file("/opt/syslog-ng/var/db/patterndb.xml")
        program-template("${MY-CUSTOM-FIELD-TO-SELECT-RULES}")
    );
};

Note that the program-template() option is available in syslog-ng OSE version 3.21 and later.

NOTE:

The default location of the pattern database file is /opt/syslog-ng/var/run/patterndb.xml. The file option of the db-parser() statement can be used to specify a different file, thus different db-parser statements can use different pattern databases.

Example: Using classification results

The following destination separates the log messages into different files based on the class assigned to the pattern that matches the message (for example, Violation and Security type messages are stored in a separate file), and also adds the ID of the matching rule to the message:

destination di_messages_class {
    file(
        "/var/log/messages-${.classifier.class}"
        template("${.classifier.rule_id};${S_UNIXTIME};${SOURCEIP};${HOST};${PROGRAM};${PID};${MESSAGE}\n")
        template-escape(no)
    );
};

Note that if you chain pattern databases, that is, use multiple databases in the same log path, the class assigned to the message (the value of ${.classifier.class}) will be the one assigned by the last pattern database. As a result, a message might be classified as unknown even if a previous parser successfully classified it. For example, consider the following configuration:

log {
    ...
    parser(db_parser1);
    parser(db_parser2);
    ...
};

Even if db_parser1 matches the message, db_parser2 might set ${.classifier.class} to unknown. To avoid this problem, you can use an 'if' statement to apply the second parser only if the first parser could not classify the message:

log {
    ...
    parser{ db-parser(file("db_parser1.xml")); };
    if (match("^unknown$" value(".classifier.class"))) {
        parser { db-parser(file("db_parser2.xml")); };
    };
    ...
};

For details on how to create your own pattern databases see The syslog-ng pattern database format.

Drop unmatched messages

If you want to automatically drop unmatched messages (that is, discard every message that does not match a pattern in the pattern database), use the drop-unmatched() option in the definition of the pattern database:

parser pattern_db {
    db-parser(
        file("/opt/syslog-ng/var/db/patterndb.xml")
        drop-unmatched(yes)
    );
};

Note that the drop-unmatched() option is available in syslog-ng OSE version 3.11 and later.


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Using parser results in filters and templates

The results of message classification and parsing can be used in custom filters and templates, for example, in file and database templates. The following built-in macros allow you to use the results of the classification:

  • The .classifier.class macro contains the class assigned to the message (for example, violation, security, or unknown).

  • The .classifier.rule_id macro contains the identifier of the message pattern that matched the message.

  • The .classifier.context_id macro contains the identifier of the context for messages that were correlated. For details on correlating messages, see Correlating log messages using pattern databases.

Example: Using classification results for filtering messages

To filter on a specific message class, create a filter that checks the .classifier_class macro, and use this filter in a log statement.

filter fi_class_violation {
    match(
        "violation"
        value(".classifier.class")
        type("string")
    );
};
log {
    source(s_all);
    parser(pattern_db);
    filter(fi_class_violation);
    destination(di_class_violation);
};

Filtering on the unknown class selects messages that did not match any rule of the pattern database. Routing these messages into a separate file allows you to periodically review new or unknown messages.

To filter on messages matching a specific classification rule, create a filter that checks the .classifier.rule_id macro. The unique identifier of the rule (for example, e1e9c0d8-13bb-11de-8293-000c2922ed0a) is the id attribute of the rule in the XML database.

filter fi_class_rule {
    match(
        "e1e9c0d8-13bb-11de-8293-000c2922ed0a"
        value(".classifier.rule_id")
        type("string")
    );
};

Pattern database rules can assign tags to messages. These tags can be used to select tagged messages using the tags() filter function.

NOTE:

The syslog-ng OSE application automatically adds the class of the message as a tag using the .classifier.<message-class> format. For example, messages classified as "system" receive the .classifier.system tag. Use the tags() filter function to select messages of a specific class.

filter f_tag_filter {tags(".classifier.system");};

The message-segments parsed by the pattern parsers can also be used as macros as well. To accomplish this, you have to add a name to the parser, and then you can use this name as a macro that refers to the parsed value of the message.

Example: Using pattern parsers as macros

For example, you want to parse messages of an application that look like "Transaction: <type>.", where <type> is a string that has different values (for example, refused, accepted, incomplete, and so on). To parse these messages, you can use the following pattern:

'Transaction: @ESTRING::.@'

Here the @ESTRING@ parser parses the message until the next full stop character. To use the results in a filter or a filename template, include a name in the parser of the pattern, for example:

'Transaction: @ESTRING:TRANSACTIONTYPE:.@'

After that, add a custom template to the log path that uses this template. For example, to select every accepted transaction, use the following custom filter in the log path:

match("accepted" value("TRANSACTIONTYPE"));
NOTE:

The above macros can be used in database columns and filename templates as well, if you create custom templates for the destination or logspace.

Use a consistent naming scheme for your macros, for example, APPLICATIONNAME_MACRONAME.


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